States With The Highest Number of Alzheimer Increases The website Wall Street 24/7 reports that Alzheimer cases are increasing in every state. For example, from 2011 to 2015 the largest increases occurred in   Arizona, Nevada, Vermont, Utah and the state with the largest increase of 54.9%, Alaska. These five states will experience a 40% or [...]

States With The Highest Number of Alzheimer Increases
The website Wall Street 24/7 reports that Alzheimer cases are increasing in every state. For example, from 2011 to 2015 the largest increases occurred in   Arizona, Nevada, Vermont, Utah and the state with the largest increase of 54.9%, Alaska. These five states will experience a 40% or more increase in Alzheimer patients.   All states will experience at least a 14% increase in Alzheimer patients. To find out more about this medical problem, visit  http://247wallst.com/special-report/2017/08/09/states-where-alzheimers-is-soaring.   Getting old isn't for wimps.

America Entered World War l One Hundred Years Ago
As America celebrates the Centennial of the U.S. entry into World War l, the Centennial Commission is offering individuals, who wish to, the opportunity to write a blog about any aspect of the war and how it has affected families, cities, countries. Blog writers should try to 'uncover' forgotten elements in the World War that include soldiers' memories, roles played by women in the war effort and soldiers' writings that have been put away and forgotten. For example, Benjamin Busch posted about discovering a WW1 cemetery in Iraq which highlighted the often neglected story of the Middle East veteran. There was more to the war in the Middle East than Lawrence of Arabia. To learn more about this, click on  http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/articles-posts.html.   Not only will this blog present ideas to be researched, but also inform writers about how to master the mechanics of posting a story on the website. This might be a very good project for an AP history student as well as for K-12 teachers who want to find history that corresponds to the war drums we hear today.

What's In The Water You Drink?
The Environmental Working Group recently posted news about a data base easily accessed which provides information about what chemicals if any are in the municipal water you drink. The drinking water task force analyzed 30 million state water quality records. When I typed in my zip code, I found that my municipal water included 7 cancer causing chemicals. The data base presents average numbers for state and national levels and provides the numbers for the local municipal water system. The national level for Chloroform is ll.2 ppb [parts per billion]. The chloroform level for New York comes in at 16.4 ppb. In my system, the numbers hit 29.9 ppb, a figure nearly 3 times the national level. To find out where your water system ranks, surf over to  https://www.ewg.org/tapwater/system.php?pws=NY6101263.

How IKEA Defines 'Domestic Bliss' In Different Cultures
Two websites recently posted stories about how IKEA, the merchandising behemoth, tailors its catalogs to sell in vastly different markets. It seems that company ethnographers conduct field research to ensure that the iconic catalog doesn't offend potential buyers by presenting photos that don't picture typical homes in a particular area. For example, the photos in the Australian edition showed large kitchens while in China, the kitchen photos shrank images to feature compact kitchens favored by the Chinese. All in all, IKEA divides its world into 72 region-specific cultural areas. To learn more about the tricks advertisers use to encourage us to buy, click on  http://jezebel.com/peek-at-how-ikea-tailors-its-catalogs-for-different-mar-1797296298.   For a more comprehensive treatment of this topic, visit  https://qz.com/1036380/ikea-catalogue-2017-defining-domestic-bliss-in-different-cultures/. All in all, this subject is fascinating and should be of interest to everyone, not just women. Enjoy.

After Chefs, Dishwashers Are The Most Important Contributors To Restaurant Success
The Washington Post recently ran a story about the importance of human dishwashers to restaurant success. Restaurant chefs and restaurant owners are slowly beginning to give dishwashers their due. Customers demand clean dishes and cutlery. The lowly dishwasher, overworked and under paid, provides this service. In fact, food writer Anthony Bourdain says his time washing restaurant dishes taught him 'every important lesson of my life.' Emeril Lagasse concurs and says that you can't have a successful restaurant without a great dishwasher. Lagasse goes on to observe that a bad dishwasher will bring down a successful operation. To read this thought provoking article, click on  http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/style/2017/08/07/chefs-say-a-dishwasher-can-make-or-break-a-restaurant-so-i-signed-up-for-a-shift/. Ironically, dishwashers are the lowest paid restaurant employees. Let's hope this change in thinking improves salaries for this group.

Weather Maps Display Rainfall Data
A consortium of federal agencies produces weather maps each week that illustrate climate conditions across the country. The week of July 30 to August 5 indicates that much of Florida received 2 inches of rain while western states such as Oregon, Washington, much of California and Nevada received only 0.1 inches of rain. For weather nerds who like data, these maps are illuminating. To learn more about US weather, click on  https://www.usda.gov/oce/weather/pubs/Weekly/Wwcb/wwcb.pdf. Scrolling down the page reveals numerous maps that disaggregate weather data in various formats.   And so it goes.