NY Governor Proclaims Composting Week Governor Cuomo recently proclaimed May 6 to 12 as Composting Week. According to the proclamation, increasing composting will reduce landfill material, reduce methane emissions and improve soil conditions. These are all notable outcomes. To read the proclamation, visit  https://www.governor.ny.gov/sites/governor.ny.gov/files/atoms/files/Compost_Awareness_Week_2018.pdf.   Of course, most of what comes out of Albany qualifies as compostable […]

NY Governor Proclaims Composting Week
Governor Cuomo recently proclaimed May 6 to 12 as Composting Week. According to the proclamation, increasing composting will reduce landfill material, reduce methane emissions and improve soil conditions. These are all notable outcomes. To read the proclamation, visit  https://www.governor.ny.gov/sites/governor.ny.gov/files/atoms/files/Compost_Awareness_Week_2018.pdf.   Of course, most of what comes out of Albany qualifies as compostable materials. Just saying.

ProPublica Posts New Game To Explain Immigration Issues
The news website  www.propublica.org  recently posted a computer news game that allows players to explore the problems immigrants face when trying to become legal residents of the U.S. The game focuses on asylum seekers. The game begins by choosing one of five asylum-seekers such as the mother who is escaping domestic violence in El Salvador. Another choice is a man who married outside of his religion from Bangladesh and faces death at home. Or a student protestor from the Democratic Republic of Congo. The game continues as players try to overcome immigration obstacles in the U.S. Players try to see how far they can go before giving up. To play the game, click on  https://projects.propublica.org/asylum/#more. Try The Waiting Game to experience the frustrations faced by very deserving individuals who want to make a new life for themselves in our country.

Census Bureau Provides Practical Lessons For Students In All Disciplines
The Department of Census compiles much more data every day than appears in the every 10-year-census program. Teachers in grades K-12 may access grade-appropriate lessons that explore issues in any of the 50 states. Downloads come in two versions: a teacher version that also provides sample answers, and a student version 5 pages long that explore various topics.   For example, a sixth grade lesson titled 'Numbers Tell the Story,' begins with a question about how the Census Bureau collects various data. The exercise directs students to answer the questions with complete sentences. Other exercises use statistical analysis appropriate for high school. To access this material, surf over to  https://www2.census.gov/programs-surveys/sis/activities/english/me-2_student.pdf. This is an example of the federal government providing free lessons that support measurable learning outcomes required by scope and sequence curricula. Materials come in English and Spanish.

New Research Argues That Typists Should Place 2 Spaces After Periods
According to a story in the Washington Post, modern writers should put 2 spaces after periods to improve reader understanding. In the old days, typing teachers enforced the 2 space rule religiously. When keyboarding replaced typing class, the conventional belief held that computer typefaces were more accurate than typewriter type, and the one-space after periods in keyboarding became the rule. Now, however, new research finds that readers comprehend text more readily if 2 spaces fall after end punctuation. The following link indicates that no such agreement exists between users. Some believe that proportional spacing does away with the two-space rule since computers use proportional fonts. To really muddy the waters, take a look at computer-generated text that is both left and right justified. The spacing between words and letters becomes very difficult to read and understand. In any case, the jury is out on spacing after end punctuation. To find out more about this, click on,  https://www.quora.com/Have-you-changed-your-mind-about-there-being-two-spaces-after-a-period. I used this link since the Washington Post wanted me to pay to view the piece, and I declined.

Post Office Will No Longer Come To The Doors Of New Construction
In an effort to reduce costs, the U.S. Postal Service is ready to implement new rules regarding mail delivery to new addresses. This new rule forces new addresses, think new housing developments, to cluster mailboxes in a central location. This rule will allow letter carriers to increase efficiency and finish routes more quickly. As of 2013, approximately one-third of addresses received door-to-door delivery. In addition, postal customers who receive curbside mail delivery will now have to cluster two or more mailboxes on a common property line. To learn more about the new postal rules, click on  https://www.govexec.com/management/2018/05/new-addresses-usps-will-no-longer-deliver-mail-your-door/147985/.   The Post Office says that most new addresses will comply with the new rules. But exceptions may be made on a case-by-case exception. In other words, if you're rich it's door to door delivery as usual.

Two Websites Argue That Nuclear Energy Is The Safest
Two websites using the same data source argue that nuclear energy is much safer than any other method of electricity generation. According to generation data, coal, oil and natural gas produce the greatest number of deaths across the world.   Other sources cause one-tenth the deaths or less of the top three methods. According to the reports, even the Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear accidents make nuclear electrical generation the safest form of energy production in terms of deaths per thousand per TWH generated. To read the reports, click on  http://metals.visualcapitalist.com/safest-source-energy/.   Additional explanations may be found at  https://ourworldindata.org/what-is-the-safest-form-of-energy. And so it goes.