Are you stressed to the max? Does your boss expect more of you than two people are able to provide? Take a deep breath and sit back. Pull out your keyboard and type www.usda.gov/beewatch. This site provides live streaming of a webcam located in Washington D.C. on the roof of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Of course the site is viewable only in daylight hours. Click on it at night and all you see is blackness. Daytime viewing shows hundreds if not thousands of honey bees crawling around the front of the hive, all bringing home nectar for future bee meals. Unless, that is, USDA employees arrive with smokers and collect some of the honey for employee use. Happy viewing.

Do you know how much TV and computer time your kids log every day? If yes, skip this paragraph. If no, read on. The National Center for Health Statistics recently published a study focusing on TV Watching and Computer Use in U.S. Youth ages 12-15. To read the report visit www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db157.htm. The report indicates that 98.5 percent of kids 12-15 watch TV daily. What are the other 1.5 percent of kids doing? 91.1 percent of kids report using computers daily outside of school. Girls were more likely to use computers less than 2 hours a day than boys. According to the report, two or more hours a day of combined TV and computer use may lead to elevated blood pressure, elevated serum cholesterol and overweight and obesity problems,. This behavior may continue into adulthood and cause individuals to become obese couch potatoes. This site provides colored graphs to indicate numbers of kids who log varying amounts of time with TVs and computers Fortunately, only 5.1 percent of kids 12 -15 years-old log more than 12 hours of TV and computer use combined daily. Yikes!

Have you ever wondered what the chemicals listed on your personal care items really do? To check out what chemicals really are in your lip balm, shampoo or lotion, visit the Environment Working Group. The Environmental Working Group knows and this knowledge will help you make smarter, healthier choices about the foods and products you purchase. Click on www.ewg@ewg.org and find out. The website provides lists of chemical additives in foods as well as the presence of toxic chemicals in consumer items. For example, do you know the fruits and vegetables with the highest amounts of pesticides? The “dirty dozen” include: apples, grapes, celery and peaches. The “clean 15 include” avocados, sweet corn, onions and asparagus. This organization also provides information on cosmetics and home cleaning products. This is a very useful site, especially for those wishing to live a Green life.

Even though governmental protection and oversight of toxic elements in our environment leaves much to be desired, the EPA provides a toxic release inventory preliminary dataset that contains the most current TRI (Toxic Chemical Inventory) each industrial facility uses, how much material the facility releases into the environment and whether the facility recycles or treats chemical waste. Visit www.epa.gov/enviro/facts/tri/search.html to get started. You can search by industry, state or individual facility listed by county and state. The site is probably most useful for full-time environmentalists and other experts. The site can be complicated to use in the beginning, so patience is necessary to get the information you want.

Want to help your children develop their money skills? The U.S. Consumer Protection Bureau may help. Click on www.consumerfinances.gov/parents/ This site provides parents with a great deal of information about teaching money skills to their kids. The web page provides many links for parents to click on for activities that teach monetary planning to kids as young as kindergarten to second grade. Click on “Money As You Grow” and find 20 Things kids need to know to live financially smart lives. Eleven to thirteen-year-olds need to learn about developing money saving habits, for example. Each age category has age-appropriate activities to encourage smart money sense. Happy tutoring. You may even learn something yourself.

Are you stressed to the max? Does your boss expect more of you than two people are able to provide? Take a deep breath and sit back. Pull out your keyboard and type www.usda.gov/beewatch. This site provides live streaming of a webcam located in Washington D.C. on the roof of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Of course the site is viewable only in daylight hours. Click on it at night and all you see is blackness. Daytime viewing shows hundreds if not thousands of honey bees crawling around the front of the hive, all bringing home nectar for future bee meals. Unless, that is, USDA employees arrive with smokers and collect some of the honey for employee use. Happy viewing. Do you know how much TV and computer time your kids log every day? If yes, skip this paragraph. If no, read on. The National Center for Health Statistics recently published a study focusing on TV Watching and Computer Use in U.S. Youth ages 12-15. To read the report visit www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db157.htm. The report indicates that 98.5 percent of kids 12-15 watch TV daily. What are the other 1.5 percent of kids doing? 91.1 percent of kids report using computers daily outside of school. Girls were more likely to use computers less than 2 hours a day than boys. According to the report, two or more hours a day of combined TV and computer use may lead to elevated blood pressure, elevated serum cholesterol and overweight and obesity problems,. This behavior may continue into adulthood and cause individuals to become obese couch potatoes. This site provides colored graphs to indicate numbers of kids who log varying amounts of time with TVs and computers Fortunately, only 5.1 percent of kids 12 -15 years-old log more than 12 hours of TV and computer use combined daily. Yikes! Have you ever wondered what the chemicals listed on your personal care items really do? To check out what chemicals really are in your lip balm, shampoo or lotion, visit the Environment Working Group. The Environmental Working Group knows and this knowledge will help you make smarter, healthier choices about the foods and products you purchase. Click on www.ewg@ewg.org and find out. The website provides lists of chemical additives in foods as well as the presence of toxic chemicals in consumer items. For example, do you know the fruits and vegetables with the highest amounts of pesticides? The “dirty dozen” include: apples, grapes, celery and peaches. The “clean 15 include” avocados, sweet corn, onions and asparagus. This organization also provides information on cosmetics and home cleaning products. This is a very useful site, especially for those wishing to live a Green life. Even though governmental protection and oversight of toxic elements in our environment leaves much to be desired, the EPA provides a toxic release inventory preliminary dataset that contains the most current TRI (Toxic Chemical Inventory) each industrial facility uses, how much material the facility releases into the environment and whether the facility recycles or treats chemical waste. Visit www.epa.gov/enviro/facts/tri/search.html to get started. You can search by industry, state or individual facility listed by county and state. The site is probably most useful for full-time environmentalists and other experts. The site can be complicated to use in the beginning, so patience is necessary to get the information you want. Want to help your children develop their money skills? The U.S. Consumer Protection Bureau may help. Click on www.consumerfinances.gov/parents/ This site provides parents with a great deal of information about teaching money skills to their kids. The web page provides many links for parents to click on for activities that teach monetary planning to kids as young as kindergarten to second grade. Click on “Money As You Grow” and find 20 Things kids need to know to live financially smart lives. Eleven to thirteen-year-olds need to learn about developing money saving habits, for example. Each age category has age-appropriate activities to encourage smart money sense. Happy tutoring. You may even learn something yourself.