Medical mysteries are crowd sourced, lady wrestlers hit the Vegas strip, the ultra-wealthy Roy family returns and a horror anthology unleashes a new terror on a World War II-era Japanese American community.

Dispatches: Weekly TV news

ABC has secured the rights to Mitchell Zuckoff’s book “Fall and Rise: The Story of 9/11.” To commemorate the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attacks, the network will develop a limited series based on the book, which tells the stories of people who were lost, saved and forever changed by the events of 9/11.

The CW announced the dates for this season’s superhero crossover, “Crisis on Infinite Earths.” The crossover will air across five different episodes of the network’s superhero slate beginning with “Supergirl” on Dec. 8, followed by “Batwoman” on Dec. 9 and “The Flash” on Dec. 10. It will wrap up with “Arrow” and “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow” on Jan. 14, 2020.

Showtime announced that the final season of “Homeland” will premiere on Feb. 9, 2020.

Contenders: Shows to keep on your radar

Have aliens made contact with Earth? “Contact” (Aug. 7, Discovery Channel, 10 p.m. ET; Aug. 8, Science Channel, 9 p.m. ET) sets out to answer the question using software from the CIA, investigative techniques borrowed from military special operations and good old-fashioned journalism to track down global leads.

Applying a crowd sourcing model to medical mysteries, “Chasing the Cure” (Aug. 8, TNT and TBS, 9 p.m. ET) teams a panel of top doctors with the show’s audience to help solve patients’ undiagnosed, misdiagnosed or uncured medical conditions.

The ladies of “Glow” head to Las Vegas in season three of the Netflix show (Aug. 9). Now in residency at the Fan-Tan Hotel and Casino, the women struggle to maintain enthusiasm for their wrestling extravaganza while figuring out who they are inside and outside the ring.

“Succession” (Aug. 11, HBO, 9 p.m. ET) is best described as a story about extremely unlikeable people that you somehow still really like. Picking up 48 hours after the events of last season, the second installment continues to explore the Roy family’s dysfunction in the context of their high-stakes global business empire. It’s a darkly funny show about the entangled professional and personal lives of a broken family.

One of the first series to depict the internment of Japanese Americans during WWII with authentic scope and scale, “The Terror: Infamy” (Aug. 12, AMC, 9 p.m. ET) focuses on a series of bizarre deaths and a man’s mission to understand and fight the malevolent force responsible. This second installment of the horror anthology mixes history, the supernatural and a haunting atmosphere of paranoia.

Family photos of everyday milestones - marriages, births, businesses, new homes - offer a glimpse into the common values of our collective past. Using the images from family photo albums across the country, filmmaker and photographer Thomas Allen Harris explores our personal histories as a way to understand both our shared history and our shared future in “Family Pictures USA” (Aug. 12, PBS, 9 p.m. ET).

Report Card: A look at ratings winners and losers

Winners: Showtime’s “City on a Hill” will return for a second season.

Losers: Netflix has canceled “The OA.”

Melissa Crawley is the author of “Mr. Sorkin Goes to Washington: Shaping the President on Television’s ‘The West Wing.’” She has a Ph.D. in media studies and is a member of the Television Critics Association. To comment on Stay Tuned, email her at staytuned@outlook.com or follow her on Twitter at @mcstaytuned.