Time for back-to-school immunizations

Yates County Public Health
The N.Y. State Department of Health requires that children attending daycare and pre-K through 12th grade must receive all required doses of vaccines on the recommended schedule in order to attend or remain in school, unless they have a valid medical exemption.

YATES COUNTY – It is almost time for schools to be back in session, and Yates County Public Health wants your children to attend school safely. The New York State Department of Health requires that children attending daycare and pre-K through 12th grade must receive all required doses of vaccines on the recommended schedule in order to attend or remain in school, unless they have a valid medical exemption. This includes all public, private, and religious schools. There are no nonmedical exemptions to school vaccine requirements in New York State.

Within 14 days of the first day of school or daycare, parents must show proof of their child’s up-to-date vaccinations, or provide a valid medical exemption from vaccination. In order to attend or remain in school or daycare, children who are unvaccinated or overdue must receive at least the first dose of all required vaccines within the first 14 days. They also must plan to receive all follow-up doses at the ages and intervals (time between doses) listed in the recommended vaccination schedule.

Vaccines required for daycare, pre-K, and school attendance:

· Diphtheria and Tetanus toxoid-containing vaccine and Pertussis vaccine (DTaP or Tdap)

· Hepatitis B vaccine

· Measles, Mumps and Rubella vaccine (MMR)

· Polio vaccine

· Varicella (Chickenpox) vaccine

Additional vaccines required for middle and high school:

· Tdap vaccine for Grades 6-12

· Meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY) for Grades 7-12

    *Students in Grade 12 need an additional booster dose of MenACWY on or after their 16th birthday

Additional vaccines required for daycare and pre-K:

· Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine (HiB)

· Pneumococcal Conjugate vaccine (PCV)

Vaccines are safe and effective in preventing serious illness. The main risk associated with vaccines is the common, mild side effects including redness and swelling at the injection site. The disease-prevention benefits of getting vaccines are much greater than the possible side effects for almost all children. If you or your child is in need of vaccines, or have any questions, call Yates County Public Health at 315-536-5160.